Macomb County Celebrates Nurses during National Nurses Week 2016!

For the 12,667 nurses working in Macomb County, May 6 marks the beginning of National Nurses Week. Nurses play a vital role in Macomb County, not just in the critical care that they provide their patients but also for their prominence within the county’s economic foundation.

Since 2000, the number of nursing jobs in Macomb County has risen 52 percent from 8,330 to 12,667. This key industry has shown healthy growth, even during the Great Recession.

Nursing1

These are great paying jobs too. The average wage is well above the average overall for private sector wages in Macomb County.

nursing3

The job outlook continues to be bright. If you are considering a career in nursing, or know someone who is, employers are certainly looking for you! Data tracked by EMSI, an economic modeling and forecasting firm, tracks online job postings. Overall, both the number of posts and unique posts continue to show significant increases.

nurse2

Within Macomb County, there are a number of nursing programs available. Oakland University, Baker University, Davenport University and Macomb Community college all offer programs for students.

In addition to National Nurses Week, as of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week each year.

To all of Macomb County’s nurses, we say thank you!

Posavetz, Nick IMG_0221Nick Posavetz is a Senior Planner for Macomb County, often providing content for the Macomb Business & Make Macomb Your Home websites and associated social media accounts. If you have something you’d like to feature, reach out to him at posavetz@macombgov.org

Retaining Macomb County businesses one cup of coffee at a time

I recently tagged along on a retention meeting Senior Economic Development Specialist Jack Johns scheduled with Minha’s Coffee Haus, a new business in Mount Clemens. It is called a retention meeting because one of the Macomb County Department of Planning & Economic Development’s objectives is to retain existing businesses in the county by connecting them with services and resources that will help them grow and succeed.

Johns, known as the food czar to some due to his extensive work with agricultural and food-processing companies, wanted to check in with Minha’s Coffee Haus to see how he may be able to assist with any needs they may have. Of course, he also wanted to get his hot chocolate fix for the day.

We met with Sora Childress and learned about the business. They are renting a 1,200-square-foot space in the heart of Mount Clemens at 58 Cherry Street. They serve coffee, caramel macchiato, Mexican hot chocolate, espresso, cappuccino, chai lattes, water and pop as well as a rotation of baked items. They had a soft opening on Monday, Dec. 28 and have already met with officials from the city of Mount Clemens, the Downtown Development Authority and other small businesses nearby.

After learning more about Minha’s Coffee Haus, Johns was able to determine a list of needs. They are considering expanding their baked goods selection, so Johns was able to connect her with other Macomb County small businesses that make and package baked goods. He also offered marketing ideas ranging from signage to business cards.

Johns was also able to provide her with information about where to acquire affordable commercial machinery, a list of local packaging suppliers, information about free internship programs and a food-safe cleaning supplies contact.

At the end of the meeting, Johns promised to follow up with additional information and check back in. He also offered his assistance for any future issues that may occur.

If you are a Macomb County business and would like to know more about the services our department offers, contact us at (586) 469-5285 or visit our website at MacombBusiness.com.

Click here to read more about Minha’s Coffee Haus on the Make Macomb Your Home Blog.

Caitlin Gerds-Habermas is an associate planner in Business Outreach and Communications for the Macomb County Department of Planning & Economic Development.

Employers hiring for top jobs feeling the pressure: Part 1 of 2

Originally published in Crain’s Detroit Business on December 8, 2015

Southeast Michigan workers are benefiting from strong employer demand, which is at a record high following the Great Recession, but employers are having trouble finding the talent they need for success.

In quarter three (Q3) 2015, the Workforce Intelligence Network for Southeast Michigan (WIN) found that regional employers posted over 137,500 online job ads—a 12.5 percent increase over the previous quarter, and a 60.1 percent increase compared to the same quarter one year ago. For more information, see WIN’s recently released quarter three labor market reports.

While demand for workers has continued to increase for over a year, the lack of aligned worker supply has employers struggling to fill many key open positions. This is in part because the labor force in in southeast Michigan (and the rest of the nation) plummeted during the recession but has failed to recover. Workers have either retired, decided to go back to school/stay in school longer, or otherwise stopped looking for traditional employment. Another reason is that there are simply not enough workers with education and skills that match top-demand occupations.

Some jobs feel the pinch of these dynamics more than others. The supply-and-demand occupation report from Career Builder includes a hiring indicator measuring labor pressure, which determines the difficulty of recruiting for a particular occupation in a specific location compared to all other occupations and locations.[1] Just six of the top 25 of the top in-demand occupations in southeast Michigan had a rating high enough for recruiting to be considered moderately easy or better, meaning that 19 of the remaining top 25 are difficult to hire for. Below are a few examples of the labor pressure metric, highlighting three of the top jobs in southeast Michigan. NOTE: The Career Builder tool examines the ratio of job postings and jobseekers using paid online job ads only.

truck driverssecretariesMech engineersMech engineers (1)

A hiring indicator score in the yellow or red area signals that the occupation is experiencing more hiring difficulty than an occupation with a number in the green. Secretaries and administrative assistants have a hiring indicator of 84, meaning that 84% of all other occupations and locations have more difficulty recruiting talent. In contrast, truck drivers have a hiring indicator of 21, meaning that just 21% of all other occupations and locations have more difficulty recruiting. Nine of the top jobs in southeast Michigan, highlighted in WIN’s Q3 2015 report, had a hiring indicator score lower than 50, signaling that recruiting for these positions was relatively difficult in southeast Michigan compared to all other occupations.

Labor Pressure Q3 2015The table below highlights the labor pressure detail for the top 25 posted jobs in southeast Michigan during Q3 2015.

Hiring for the top in-demand jobs in southeast Michigan may be made more difficult for several reasons, including technical skill and higher qualification requirements. For example, two-thirds of the top 25 occupations during Q3 2015 required a bachelor’s degree, a credential that just one-fourth of Michiganders hold. Of the six occupations with relative ease in recruiting, just one—sales representatives, non-technical non-scientific products—required a bachelor’s degree.

Quarter three is historically when employment and employer demand peaks for many counties in southeast Michigan, and the data collected often points to upcoming trends. In this case, anticipated trends include continuously high and growing employer demand and relatively low labor force participation. Should the labor force in southeast Michigan (and the nation, for that matter) continue to maintain lower education levels and a mismatch in technical skills and experiences, employers will continue to have difficulty finding talent to fill their open positions and employment growth with slow.

***The follow-up blog in this series will dive deeper into the educational attainment and training requirements of the top jobs in the region.

This blog was developed with data and research compiled by Hector Acosta, research and data analyst at WIN.

[1] The hiring indicator score is calculated using data from CareerBuilder, a third party aggregator, and Economic Modeling Specialists, Intl (EMSI).

Macomb manufacturing continues to grow with latest development

The largest development in Sterling Heights since Lakeside Mall was recently announced. Sunnybrook golf course, located along 17 Mile Road near Van Dyke, will be developed into a 144-acre state-of-the-art manufacturing site along with two new hotels. This news is exciting and continues to showcase how important manufacturing is to Macomb County’s economy.

While exciting, the fact that new manufacturing continues to grow in Macomb is not a surprise. This is a trend that has been clear since 2009. In fact, in 2014 Macomb County was third among all counties in the nation for manufacturing growth.

Manufacturing Jobs
Manufacturing jobs in Macomb County have rebounded since 2008

Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel calls this development “another example of how this city and Macomb County are leading the greater Midwest as the hub of advanced manufacturing.”

This rings true across a number of statistics: More than 30,000 workers are engaged in R&D at 350 local labs and facilities, in a region that graduates roughly 12,000 engineers and science degrees annually. We are home to a full quarter of the world’s advanced manufacturing workforce. (Want to learn more? View our targeted industry brochure.)

Companies are seeing this and taking advantage of what Macomb has to offer. Major investments by long-time industry leaders are complemented by new investments from companies eager to tap Macomb County’s talent.

The outlook continues to be bright. The big three are seeing constant double digit growth. Rises in new orders and production are boosting the industry in the U.S.

Are you a manufacturer looking to grow or locate in Macomb County? Reach out to our economic development professionals. In 2014, clients of the department invested nearly a quarter billion dollars and created more than 1,600 new jobs.

Finally, if you’re worried about the state of golf in the county, fear not, for there are still ample great opportunities to get out and enjoy a round.

Nick Posavetz is a senior planner for Macomb County, providing content for the Macomb Business website. If you have a topic you would like to be featured, reach out to him at posavetz@macombgov.org. 

Macomb County making connections at international Army conference in D.C.

The AUSA Annual Meeting & Exposition is the largest U.S. Army-based conference. It draws in both national and international firms who are interested in growing their defense market. For Macomb County, this conference is ripe with decision makers and potential business attraction prospects.

Recently, staff from the Macomb County Department of Planning & Economic Development, including Director Stephen Cassin, Project Coordinator James Ahee and myself, traveled to Washington, D.C. to participate in the conference. Also in attendance was Deputy County Executive Mark Deldin and representatives from the Michigan Defense Center, Detroit Regional Chamber and Butzel Long.

We visited all the international pavilions at the event. Countries like Turkey, Israel, Germany, Korea, UK, Canada and Australia were represented. We informed them about Macomb County’s defense assets such as TACOM LCMC, TARDEC and Selfridge Air National Guard Base and about major prime contractors in the region.

_EPP9023While speaking with these international companies, we also extended an invite to attend our Arsenal of Innovation Reception to hear from Brig. Gen. Gwen Bingham, commanding general of TACOM LCMC, and Brig. Gen. Michael Stone from the Michigan National Guard. This year, we invited BAE Systems’ vice president and general manager of combat vehicles to speak on why they are located in the Defense Corridor.

Approximately 175 guests attended this reception sponsored by the Michigan Defense Center, Butzel Long and our department. This is our fourth year hosting a reception at the AUSA Annual Meeting & Exposition, and we are seeing the benefits.

As a result of our participation in the conference, an Australian company reached out to us for a tour of our International Landing Zone (ILZ). They heard about the ILZ through a contact at BAE Systems who was in attendance at our Arsenal of Innovation Reception. Also, the government of Australia is looking to come to Michigan in the springtime with a delegation of Australian companies. Furthermore, we are working to schedule an Israeli defense delegation visit. These visits are excellent opportunities for our department to show international companies why they should locate their business in Macomb County.

Vicky Rad is the deputy director of the Macomb County Department of Planning & Economic Development.